It seems to feel once more our world is thrown into chaos through hatred, unkindness, intolerance and greed. Wars rage with the potential for unrest to fester and spread.

This Remembrance Day, I believe it is important to step back, breath deeply and reclaim a place of calm within; after all, “as within, so without.” This is the perfect occasion to reflect and remember exactly why calm is so important…

 

Click on this link to breathe easy

 

…because without it “things” can get out of hand pretty quickly.

Things like war can happen. I tend to feel there are no real winners in war, yet I have to admit I don’t have the solution to keeping the peace all the time either. Part of me realizes life is simply lesson after lesson and we all need to learn.

Personally, I want to avoid the pain of war – at all costs.  Yet, I am grateful for those who stand on guard to protect when seemingly all other options have failed.

It’s difficult for the best and brightest of us to begin to make real sense of war, let alone explaining it to a child. But the key to our future is… oh you know this one…

Our children

So how do we help children understand war below the surface and beyond a red plastic flower (that often pricks our finger, a reminder of blood shed or falls from our jacket unnoticed)? Can youth be inspired to become the bearers of peace?  Turns out the answer, like so many really, is quite simple. It starts with kindness and caring about one another.

One of our Canadian veteran’s, Jack Purdie has helped young people make a connection. His daughter, Colleen Fuller, shared this reflection about her father’s ability to explain this challenging subject in terms even the youngest can understand and appreciate.

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credit Colleen Fuller and Jack Purdie

Do you want to know how a Vet (our father) explains the war to young children?

I can answer that one! He talks to little ones about how war is the same as bullying. It’s deciding that you and your country are more important than anybody else, so you can hurt them and take their stuff (Like Hitler did to Poland). They understand that that is not right. And they understand that sometimes you have to stand up for your friends when they are being bullied. He talks about how caring about other people and not thinking you are more important can stop little wars (on the playground) and big ones. He encourages them to be heroes who look after other people and help them, like our soldiers were trying to do.
Help your kids make sense of Remembrance Day! 

by Colleen Fuller and Jack Purdie

submitted by Danay Lott

reprinted with permission

 

 

Children are our future. The children of today will be making the decisions of tomorrow. It is important that they remember so they can understand how to resolve issues and stand up for each other in kind and caring ways. Because I believe that Mr. Purdie is right. We need to care about each other and be everyday heroes everyday.

 

Mr. Purdie proudly served his country and we believe it’s not only important to learn the lessons our veteran’s share with us, but also to get to know them better as the people they are. His daughter, Danay Lott, kindly  provided these insights into her father’s life.

Jack Purdie was a young boy the fall of 1939 when Canada had joined Britain in a war against Germany. His dad joined up the first day and left almost immediately for England sending his pay home to feed his family. Jack was unable to afford school books so worked odd jobs to help his family until he turned seventeen when, with his mother’s permission, he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Airforce. After training in various parts of Canada he ended up in Mount Pleasant PEI. Finally this group was shipped over seas in 1943 arriving in Liverpool England. He was trained as a tail gunner on the crew of a Lancaster bomber and spent two years in England. He was on his way home crossing the Atlantic with a ship full of other men in the summer of 1945 when VE Day was announced. He tells the story that when the victory was announced each man on the ship was given a bottle of beer and an orange to celebrate the end of the war! Jack traded his beer for a second orange which was a rare commodity indeed! Jack is now living in Vancouver BC at age ninety one he spends time at schools sharing stories of this time in his life with many age groups. He challenges the kids to be every day heroes and caring concerned members of their communities.

Lest We Forget

 

©2016 JFries/Rise Like Air

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