Archives for posts with tag: brené brown

‘Tis the season to be jolly and giving. Some of us have just a few people on our lists and others have a list to rival the old man’s in red himself.

But even before the big day arrives, there’s a gift worth giving. And the first deserving person is…

you

Brené Brown talks about the power of permission slips when dealing or reckoning with emotions in her best seller “Rising Strong”. After all dealing with emotions can be difficult, something we’d rather avoid than face head on.

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The act of giving yourself permission to engage with your emotions in a situation is incredibly empowering.  On one hand it sounds so simple, but as Brown puts it,

“This work takes practice. Awkward, uncomfortable practise.” And by the way, you’re worth the gift.

Maybe it’s the neighbour’s annual party you dread.

I give myself permission to say no.

Or that new job offer in a different city

I give myself permission to feel excited and adventurous.

When you lose someone you love.

I give myself permission to feel sad and to grieve.

Maybe it’s after a divorce.

I give myself permission to feel afraid and lonely.

Or after losing a big business deal.

I give myself permission to learn from my experiences.

When a friend lies about you.

I give myself permission to feel hurt and angry.

Maybe before a first date.

I give myself permission to smile in anticipation and be myself.

Or after a first date.

I give myself permission to feel excited and good about myself.

Maybe after a promotion.

I give myself permission to believe in my abilities.

Or after a life altering diagnosis.

I give myself permission to feel afraid and hopeful.

 

So… grab a piece of paper and your favourite pen…

However and whatever you celebrate this time of year give yourself the gift of permission and may your spirits rise like air all year.

After all, it really is all good, it’s just how you choose to look at things.

©2017 JFries/Rise Like Air

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I’m reading Brené Brown. I recently finished The Gift Of Imperfection and immediately ordered all the rest.  So now I’m on I Thought It Was Just Me (But It Isn’t) .  Guess what?

She’s right!!!! It isn’t just me!!! Spoiler alert – the glow of that realization only lasts so long.  I’m glad I’m not alone. I’m glad I’m so abnormal and dysfunctional I’m completely normal.  Doesn’t change a dang thing about the process though… Still gotta walk the walk, talk the talk and get moving. Sigh. Note: Always read the fine print which says something like “I never said it would be easy, but it will be worth it.”  Oh Fine!

Shame. It’s something we’ve all experienced numerous times in our lives. And it’s something most of us would really rather not talk about it seems. So I’m grateful that Brené Brown has removed the stigma from the topic.  She defines shame as,

the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging – something we’ve experienced, done, or failed to do makes us unworthy of connection. I don’t believe shame is helpful or productive.

While discussing Shame Screens, those screens we put up to protect ourselves when we feel that burn of shame creeping into us, – which another spoiler alert –  don’t work by the way (to be honest, I’d already figured that one out… ) Brené references the work of Dr. Shelley Uram, a Harvard-trained psychiatrist.

“But Dr. Uram points out that we tend not to recognize the small, quiet traumas that often trigger the same brain-survival reaction. After studying Dr. Uram’s work I believe it’s possible that many of our early shame experiences, especially with parents and caregivers, were stored in our brains as traumas.  This is why we often have such painful bodily reactions when we feel criticized, ridiculed, rejected and shamed. Dr. Uram explains that the brain does not differentiate between overt or big trauma and cover or small, quiet trauma – it just registers the event as “a threat that we can’t control.”

In her work on “remembering the wound” versus “becoming the wound,” Dr. Uram explains that most of the time when we recall a memory, we are conscious that we are in the present, recalling something from the past.  However, when we experience something in the present that triggers and old trauma memory, we reexperience the sense of the original trauma. So, rather than remembering the wound, we become the wound.  This makes sense when we think of how we are often returned to a place of smallness and helplessness when we feel shame.” page 89  I Thought It Was Just Me – Brené Brown

That was a little mind blowing for me. And it made perfect sense.

My first thoughts were about empathy and compassion. Maybe there  really is no scale for trauma at all. Trauma just is – regardless of what caused it, or how “big” or “small” we may think our own or someone else’s trials and tribulations are, the size of the emotion we feel, the reaction we have – are the same.  That’s it. It’s the great equalizer for me.

It…

wait for it….

Changed my perspective and perception.

Yup it did. Here’s the thing, it made life a whole lot simpler. No analyzing or measuring required.  We’re equal.  We are in it together. It hurts. It’s painful. Its frustrating.

And that’s the catalyst for me to build my resilience. There are tools to do it. As Harriet Lerner, author of The Dance of Anger reminds us, “Shame is a profoundly debilitating emotion. It drives our fears of not being good enough.” And here’s the kicker, we are good enough. So let’s start moving toward believing it and living it. I’m worth it. So are you.

Rise on.

©2017 JFries/Rise Like Air

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Brené Brown always seems to know exactly what I need to know to learn and grow. Her book “The Gift of Imperfection” has offered so much. So why did it take me so long to finish I wonder.


  

©2016 JFries/Rise Like Air

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